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Early Signs of Pregnancy For Teenage Women

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The early signs of pregnancy in teenagers are often difficult to identify. The first two weeks after conception, the only symptoms that a woman might notice is increasing her basal body temperature. Other symptoms may not show up for several more weeks or months after your period is late. If you have been trying to get pregnant and think it might be happening soon, keep an eye out for these common early pregnancy symptoms:

Changes in your usual menstrual cycle can be a big sign. Most women won’t miss a period, but some might have very light periods or spotting before they get their next period. Some might even find that their next few cycles are shorter than normal or longer than normal, and lighter or heavier than normal. If you do notice any changes to how long it takes for your body to start ovulating after intercourse without birth control (or if you don’t menstruate at all), this is considered an early pregnancy symptom too. It can happen within 18 days of conception.

Sore breasts. This can be a very early symptom of pregnancy as well, even before your period is late. If you think that you might be pregnant, had unprotected sex or forgot to take your birth control pills for a few days, keep an eye on how sore they are because this could mean the difference between life and death for a developing baby.

Fatigue. Unfortunately, it will happen no matter what, but many women feel tired earlier than usual when they’re expecting. You’ll likely need more sleep than normal just to function during the day without feeling too tired out easily by running errands, cooking dinner, or even (gasp) exercising.

Increased thirst. This is one symptom of pregnancy that you might actually be glad to notice early on. It’s also pretty common because pregnant women tend to retain more water than usual during their first trimester, so don’t worry if it doesn’t let up for a few months into your pregnancy either.

Light spotting after conception is called implantation bleeding. Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case, though – some women have had light periods throughout all nine months without cramping, while others have experienced heavy blood loss at every turn. If you experience any vaginal bleeding with clots in addition to these symptoms, you should call your doctor right away.

Breast tenderness is one symptom that many women will experience before they even realize that they’re pregnant. It can be tough to figure out if this early breast sensitivity is due to pregnancy or just a hormonal imbalance – but fortunately for most women who are expecting, it’s former and not the latter. Suppose you think about other symptoms like missed periods, nipple tingling, abdominal bloating (even though there’s no baby yet.), mood swings, vomiting, or nausea with smell sensitivity. In that case, these could all indicate an increased likelihood of being pregnant as well. Some people might feel heavy breasts very early in their first trimester, but that’s not a definite sign of pregnancy for everyone.

Constipation or diarrhea (or both). Unfortunately, these are pretty common pregnancy symptoms, but luckily, they don’t usually last throughout the entire nine months either. If you’re having problems with your bowel movements, it’s best to call your doctor immediately

It can be a sign of serious conditions like ectopic pregnancy, and it’s not worth the risk to ignore these symptoms for too long.

Cravings for certain foods you wouldn’t normally eat (or hate). So if you’re pregnant, how bad could morning sickness get anyway? Unfortunately pretty terrible. While many women only experience nausea or vomiting in their first trimester though, some unlucky ladies might throw up at random throughout all three months – so try not to feel guilty about skipping out on family dinners just because everyone else wants chili dogs and your stomach won’t stop turning.

Increased sex drive. Okay, so this isn’t always an early sign of pregnancy – but if you have a lot more energy than usual and feel like your libido has come back with new strength, then congratulations: the chances are that you’re expecting. It’s also worth noting that some women might even experience lower levels of sexual desire during their first trimester, too though these symptoms will usually go away as soon as the morning sickness does (relief)

Cramps. Unfortunately, these are pretty common during the first trimester, too, so if you’re feeling aches or cramps accompanied by vaginal bleeding, then call your doctor right away. The cramping could be a sign of an ectopic pregnancy which is why it’s always best to err on the side of caution when faced with any strange symptoms like this.

Mood swings. It’s no secret that pregnancy can be a pretty emotional time for women, but there are certain symptoms that could indicate something more serious than just being hormonal Mood swings accompanied by vaginal bleeding, severe cramps, or other concerning signs like fatigue should all trigger an early visit to the doctor.

Dizziness and fainting spells. If you’re pregnant, then dizzy spells after eating (which is sometimes called “getting up too fast”) might sound pretty familiar. You may also feel lightheaded when standing or sitting up quickly though these aren’t always warning signs of pregnancy either; they could instead be side effects from increased blood pressure. But don’t disregard them if it seems like your baby bump is growing too quickly for comfort.

Frequent urination. This might sound like something out of middle school health class but frequent urination could actually be an early sign of pregnancy. It happens mostly during the first trimester too. If this symptom doesn’t get any better as time goes on, call your doctor right away because it could indicate problems like preterm labor or other more serious complications.

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